Physicians most challenged by money problems in 2009

Money and modernization are the roots of the main challenges facing physicians in 2009. Among the top ten most challenging issues facing American doctors, 7 in 10 directly involve economics, two involve data and reporting, and one–recruiting physicians–fell two places since last year’s survey.According to the 2009 survey of physicians by the Medical Group Management […]

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The challenge of putting the patient at the center of health reform while controlling costs

Today’s Los Angeles Times features a story in their health beat called, “In healthcare debate, ‘reality’ is in dispute.” All-comers have arrived on the ever-more populated health reform opinion stage, from Sarah Palin (calling President Obama’s plan “downright evil”) to Nancy Pelosi calling town hall protestors “unAmerican.” To counter the disses and naysayers, the White […]

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Americans’ spending on complementary and alternative medicine is up, but most of the increase is "do-it-yourself" care

U.S. adults spent $33.9 billion on complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) in 2007. The largest expenditure on CAM was on self-care costs of $22.0 billion, the largest component of which was $14.8 billion spent on non-vitamin, non-mineral natural products. In addition, Americans spent $11.9 out-of-pocket (OOP) on practitioners such as chiropractic, osteopathic manipulation, naturopathy and […]

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Health reform shouldn't add to the deficit, most Americans say, as support erodes

It’s still all-economy, all-the-time for most Americans in August 2009. When it comes to health reform plans, if a new scheme’s costs will add to the U.S. deficit, then most Americans say, ‘no go.’ In the Quinnipiac Poll of August 5 2009, 55% of U.S. voters were concerned that Congress’s health plan would add to […]

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The doubling of depression meds, and hope in web and mobile platforms for talk therapy

The use of anti-depressant medications nearly doubled between 1996 and 2005, according to an analysis published in the August issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry. In 2005, 10.1% of Americans used anti-depressant meds, compared with 5.8% in 1996. A key trend underneath the dramatically increased use of anti-depressant meds was the decline in talk […]

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